Archive for category Dispensationalism

Why I Never Changed My Mind About the Millennium — # 2

# 2

In two earlier posts, I gave some introductory remarks responding to Sam Storms’ blog entry entitled “Why I Changed My Mind About the Millennium” along with my initial response to his first reason why he can’t hold to the premillennial position – the idea that death in the kingdom, from Storm’s point of view, can’t be harmonized with the alleged truth that Jesus ends death at the Second Coming.  I will deal here with his second reason.  It is somewhat helpful that Sam Storms’ book Kingdom Come has recently been released.  Although a more complete analysis will come later, it will prove helpful here at filling in more detail than his outline given in the blog at the website of the Gospel Coalition.

The second reason that Storms gives is that if you are a premillennialist, “you must necessarily believe that the natural creation will continue, beyond the time of Christ’s second coming, to be subjected to the curse imposed by the Fall of man.”  He goes on to affirm that, in conjunction with this idea, “the natural creation is set free from its bondage at the parousia.”

The basic idea is that premillennialism cannot be right since it teaches that Christ’s Second Coming does not end the curse on the natural created order.  This particular argument is actually a variation of the one I responded to in my last post about the end of death since death is the primary result of the curse.

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Why I Never Changed My Mind About the Millennium — # 1

# 1

In an earlier post I started this series responding to Sam Storms’ Gospel Coalition post on why he changed his mind about the millennium (from premillennial to amillennial).  In that post, I dealt with some introductory things.  Starting with this post, I will make one post each for the six reasons he gives to allegedly prove that premillennialism is untenable.  Hopefully in a friendly way I can make some assertions that help to defend the premillennial understanding of the end times.

The first reason that Sam gives is that if you are a premillennialist, “you must necessarily believe that physical death will continue to exist beyond the time of Christ’s second coming.”  He goes on to couple that statement with the words “death is defeated and swallowed up in victory at the parousia.”  Sam’s post is just giving general statements and not the detailed arguments that will naturally be present when his book Kingdom Come is released soon.  However, I would like to take a stab at responding to the general statement here.

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Another Homegoing of a Great Christian Man

Roy ZuckMany blogs started to go up over the weekend when word was received that Dr. Roy Zuck went home to be with the Lord late Saturday.  He was Academic Dean at Dallas Theological Seminary for most of the time I was a student at DTS.  I thought it was appropriate for me also to share my memories of a man of such character as Dr. Zuck.  He is greatly loved and respected, especially by those in the DTS family, but also by many evangelicals outside the seminary family who appreciated his contribution to teaching, theology, and publishing.

I was a New Testament major in my STM at Dallas.  Having obtained an M.Div. at Liberty Baptist Seminary, I did not have as many opportunities to have contact with Dr. Zuck as did the DTS Th.M. students.  In fact, I never had a formal for credit class with him (which is disappointing).   

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Why I Never Changed My Mind About the Millennium

IntroductionDTS Stearns Arches

With this post I am beginning a series of seven posts giving response to the testimony and basic argumentation of amillennialist Sam Storm.  Storm, whom I have never met to my knowledge, took advantage of the opportunity that the Gospel Coalition website gave to post testimonies of evangelicals who had changed their minds about some doctrine.  His well written summary gave some testimonial information about his experience as a student at Dallas Seminary 1973-77,  his wrestling with tenets of dispensational premillennialism (especially the pre-trib rapture), and six essential arguments showing biblical information that he insists cannot be handled within a dispensational framework.  I had intended to respond when I first saw the article by Storm a couple of months ago, but I came down with an illness and then my heavy travel schedule for Baptist Bible Seminary in February moved it off my table for a while.  It is spring break now, so I am picking it back up.  In doing so, I want to treat Storm with respect and hope he will do the same for me.  I have no basis by which to judge him as something other than a fine brother in Christ, who simply disagrees with the position that I hold.  However, our differences do matter for theology and ministry in the churches.  I will use his first name below to highlight friendship in Christ in spite of our differences.

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Homegoing of a Good Friend

Couch MalOn February 12, 2013, my good friend Dr. Mal Couch went home to be with his Lord and Savior after a long battle with cancer.  I had done an audio interview with him not long ago that has been distributed on CD.  Apparently, he was busy for the Lord’s work until the very end of his life on earth.

I met Mal and his wife Lacy in the early 1990s.  I was the pastor of Tabernacle Baptist Church in Arlington, Texas and was looking for a good female biblical counselor to whom I could refer the women of my church.  The women in my church were not sufficiently mature to do such counseling except perhaps for one or two, but none were trained in biblical counseling.  I did not like to do a lot of counseling of women.  I don’t remember how I found the BACA Counseling Center which Lacy Couch was running, but it was located over in Ft. Worth only a few miles from my church in Arlington.  When I went over there to meet her and talk to her I found something I did not know existed! — Tyndale Theological Seminary.  Mal had started the seminary in light of a perceived decline in theological education in his view.  He was a graduate of “Old Dallas” (Dallas Theological Seminary).  He was not in favor of changes that were bringing about a “New Dallas.”   I was a Ph.D. student at Dallas when I met Mal.  So our conversation was an interesting one.

Perhaps my fondest memory of Mal was his generosity.  For several years in a row he paid my way to the Dallas–Ft. Worth area to speak at the Conservative Theological Society annual meeting which he had started.  This is where I presented some of my first exegetical papers in a conference setting and where I explored some issues related to traditional dispensationalism, something that Mal and I agreed on in the general sweep of things.  To be sure we had some specific differences.  For years he would introduce me at his conference as his good friend but a congregational Baptist and used the moment to teach elder rule at my expense!  I once told him and the conference attenders I could follow elder rule as long as I was the elder!  We had some fun with our differences but I will remember Mal’s generosity which allowed me to fly half way across the country to Texas and participate in these times of theological discussions.  I will always remember him also as a man who loved the Word of God.  I will miss Mal. But because of the truth that both of us believe, I will see him again at the resurrection.

Council on Dispensational Hermeneutics

This year a group of traditional dispensational professors from several different schools will descend upon the College of Biblical Studies in Houston, Texas for meetings on October 3-4.  They will be joined by pastors, students, and other observers, especially from the Houston metropolitan area.  This will be the fifth annual meeting of the Council.  However, it will be the first not held at Baptist Bible Seminary.  The decision has been made to meet in a different part of North America every other year.  The goal is to network more broadly with traditional dispensationalists, both professors and pastors.  Next year (2013) we will be back on the beautiful campus of Baptist Bible College & Seminary in Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania.

The theme for this year’s 2012 Council is “Dispensationalism and Biblical Preaching.”  Although we are sometimes accused of a theology based upon “simple Bible readings” mixed with “presupposed theological systems,” we are not embarrassed by a focus on inductive Bible study and expository preaching.  Not all traditional dispensationalists, however, preach consistently with what they believe biblically and theologically.  There is too much application without exposition.  One can find strange typology popping out at certain points.  The development of themes sometimes sloganizes the Bible instead of providing genuine exposition of the sacred text.  This ought not to be so.  If anyone should practice biblical expository preaching, it is traditional dispensationalists!

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Embarrassment and Prophecy

Last year with the failed predictions of Harold Camping (once again…and again), we have been reminded by many of the failed prophecies of the past.  Many come from the cults (Jehovah’s Witnesses, Seventh-Day Adventists/Millerites).  Y2K was extremely revealing and financially profitable for some video makers.  There were both Christian and secular alarmists on that one.  I have been especially curious about the rise of non-Christian doomsday prophecies that seem to proliferate in our culture — all of them NOT coming from a dispensational premillennial outlook on the rapture of the church. Read the rest of this entry »

Council on Dispensational Hermeneutics 2011

Next week is the fourth annual Council on Dispensational Hermeneutics held at Baptist Bible Seminary (Sept. 21-22).  Our topic is Dispensationalism and the Holy Spirit.  I am a little amazed at the paper proposals that came in.  Certainly they are from good men and will tackle special issues such as the baptism of the Spirit.  However, there were no papers that dealt strictly with the filling of the Spirit and the debates surrounding Ephesians 5:18-21.  Furthermore, there were no papers on cessation of the sign gifts.  Perhaps we can come at those issues next year or in later meetings.  Elliott Johnson told our steering committee last year that dispensationalists used to own the issue of the Holy Spirit.  However, it has come to the place of being neglected in many dispensational circles.  The council this year is partly designed to address this problem.  Those of you who are traditional dispensationalists, please pray for our meetings as we interact with each other on these important issues.

Zeal for Zion

I have just finished my reading of Shalom Goldman’s excellent book Zeal for Zion: Christians, Jews, and the Idea of the Promised Land (UNC Press).  Goldman is professor of Hebrew and Middle Eastern studies at Emory University.  I had made an earlier post on it in my earlier stages of reading.  While I think there are times when he is off in his assessment of various relationships and his portrayal of various theological views, on the whole he has provided an excellent outline of the historical convergence of Christian forms of Zionism and Jewish forms of Zionism since the late 1800s.  Perhaps the primary contribution he makes to the history of Zionism is to show that it is not a monolithic movement.  While this has been recognized on the Jewish side, on the Christian side it has been assumed in some circles (popularly?) that modern dispensationalism, which is Zionist by its very nature, is the only Christian form of Zionism.  This came home to me a few years ago at the Evangelical Theological Society.  Tommy Ice, a dispensationalist responder, pointed out to the main speaker Timothy Weber, that in his analysis (see Weber’s book On the Road to Armageddon) he assumed that all Christian Zionists were dispensationalists, when such is not the case.  Goldman’s book helps to support Ice’s conclusion and critique.

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Dispensationalism and the Charge of Anti-Semitism

1920s Article on the Protocols of the Elders of Zion

Covenant theologians have long been sensitive to being charged with anti-Semitism.  Recall the discussions about the Knox Seminary Open Letter and my response to it which can be found here in the eschatology section of the drop-down menus (click on systematic theology to get to eschatology).  However, it seems that dispensationalists are also occasionally charged with being anti-Semitic.  Apparently, no one in the evangelical world is immune to the charge.

Often I see the name Arno C. Gaebelein come up in such disucssions.  I am well-versed in Gaebelein’s life and work since I did my Ph.D. dissertation on him.  But I continue to be amazed at the misinformation that is broadcast about him on many fronts, including his attitudes about Jews.  To be sure, in my dissertation I analytically criticize him on many fronts as any dissertation writer would do.  In my case, it was a focus on Gaebelein’s theological method although I also get into the life influences upon Gaebelein and his attitudes about the Jews.

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